New Report on the Cost of Kids: Reading Between the Lines

Originally in ForbesThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently released its annual “Cost of Raising a Child” report. The news from it is really no news at all to us parents—kids are stinking expensive and growing even more so. However, if you read between the lines, there are three extremely important points that don’t show up in the executive summary:

My family outside of the South Carolina Aquarium in Charleston

1)   Parents still have a choice. The USDA estimates that households with less than $61,530 in income will spend a total of $176,550 per child. Meanwhile, “middle-income parents” making between $61,530 and $106,540 each year can anticipate spending $245,340 per kid. Those blessed with household income over $106,540 should expect to spend $407,820.  

Here’s how I read these numbers: It likely costs approximately $175,000 to care for a child’s needs in today’s dollars. Beyond that, it’s our choice as parents if and how we spend additional money on our progeny. When your household income jumps from $106,000 to $107,000, the USDA isn’t holding a gun to your head and demanding that you spend an additional $162,480 per child.

It’s completely up to you, and you may choose to spend more or less than some of the USDA estimates. For example, you may choose (wisely) to spend more on one child than another for various, justifiable reasons, including each individual child’s own gifts and weaknesses. If you choose to put even one child through private school, from kindergarten through a graduate degree, you could easily spend a million bucks just for education—and college isn’t even included in the USDA’s numbers.

It’s not how much you spend but how you spend it—and whether you can afford it—that’s important.

2)   It’s important to introduce children to the realities of money early. The cost of being parents shouldn’t be a taboo topic with our children. In fact, children should be introduced to the reality of money and the cost of living as early as they can comprehend it.

As they age, we should give our children more and more information and put more control in their hands. Money was—and still is for many—a taboo topic, and that needs to change. I’m not suggesting you share everything about your financial world with your kids. But find a way to help them understand that they are their own ecosystem, albeit one that resides within your family.

I recently discussed this topic on the Nightly Business Report.

3)   Couples who avoid this topic do so at their peril. More than 50% of marriages end in divorce and more than 50% of those couples list financial disagreements as the primary reason for their breakup. The emotionally charged decisions we make, and specifically those decisions related to our children, provide the perfect context for serious disagreement. So, if you want to give your marriage a sporting chance, openly discuss and specifically plan for child-related expenses.

I’ll never forget having coffee with a mentor of mine about 11 years ago and discussing this topic. On a personal level, my wife and I were ready to begin a family, but as a financial planner, I didn’t feel like we were prepared.

“You’ll never feel like you’re ready,” my mentor told me. “No matter when you decide to do this, it will be a leap of faith.” Our boys, Kieran and Connor, just started the fifth and third grades, respectively, and I must say I’m forever grateful that I followed the advice of my mentor.

Choosing to start a family is about a great deal more than financial readiness and planning, but your marriage and your children will be better for it.

If you enjoyed this post, please let me know on Twitter at @TimMaurer, and if you'd like to receive my weekly post via email, click HERE.

 

The Top 10 Places Your Next Dollar Should Go

Originally in ForbesThere is no shortage of receptacles clamoring for your money each day. No matter how much money you have or make, it could never keep up with all the seemingly urgent invitations to part with it.

TOP 10 DOLLAR

Separating true financial priorities from flash impulses is an increasing challenge, even when you’re trying to do the right thing with your moola — like saving for the future, insuring against catastrophic risks and otherwise improving your financial standing. And while every individual and household is in some way unique, the following list of financial priorities for your next available dollar is a reliable guide for most.

Once you’ve spent the money necessary to cover your fixed and variable living expenses (and yes, I realize that’s no easy task for many) consider spending your additional dollars in this order:

  1. Create (or update) your estate planning documents. Your estate planning, or lack thereof, is unlikely to make headlines like that of the rich and famous. But the frightening implications of not planning for your inevitable demise lands it in the top financial priority slot, especially for parents of minor children. With extremely rare exceptions, every independent adult should have the following three documents drafted, preferably, by an estate planning attorney: a will, durable powers of attorney and advance directives (health care power of attorney and a living will).
  2. Ensure that insurance needs are met. Don’t become the next heart-wrenching 20/20 segment because your family was left destitute after you died or became disabled without adequate insurance for such catastrophic events. Please note, however, the difference between insurance needs and wants. Surprisingly, most insurance needs — especially regarding life insurance— are sufficiently covered with policies that are less expensive than the all-inclusive, bell-and-whistle products often recommended by insurance agents.
  3. Pay off any high-interest consumer debt. It’s hard to build assets when you’re dragged down by liabilities. A new report out from the Urban Institute indicates that one-in-three Americans have debt in collections — you know, that’s when you get nasty calls from unforgiving call centers that purchased your debt for pennies on the dollar from credit card companies and medical care providers, among others. That’s roughly 77 million people! The economic and emotional toll of consumer debt, especially at astronomical rates, makes it financial enemy number one (or, in this case, number three).
  4. Build at least one month’s worth of living expenses in emergency savings. Savings is the first line of defense against cancerous consumer debt. Yes, of course I’d like you to have more than a month saved, but the next priority is just too good to put off …
  5. Earn free money by taking advantage of your company’s 401(k) match. Many companies offer to incentivize employee retirement savings by matching, up to a certain amount, the percentage of your salary that you contribute to the company retirement plan. They may match 100% of the first 3% of your salary that you elect to save, or 50% of the first 6%. In any case, give yourself a guaranteed rate of return by gobbling up those matching contributions from your employer. If not, you’re leaving money on the table.
  6. Contribute to a 529 plan for education savings. Education should not be prioritized over retirement, and merely contributing the matched amount to your 401(k) is not likely to secure your future retirement. But once you have checked off numbers one through five, it’s time to consider opening up 529 accounts for children you intend to help through college. Contribute what you can and invite loving relatives to do the same.
  7. Contribute the maximum possible to your Roth IRA(s) if your income level allows you to. Nothing’s better than free money, but tax-free money comes close. By contributing to a Roth IRA, you’re filling a bucket of money that should never be taxed (as long as you wait until after age 59.5 to take gains). And, if you are hit with an emergency that runs through your reserves, you can take your principal contributions back out of your Roth IRA at any age for any reason without taxes or penalties. In 2014, you can contribute $5,500 per person or $6,500 per if you’re age 50 or older. The ability to contribute to a Roth IRA goes away entirely, however, if your income level is above $191,000 in 2014.
  8. Return to strengthen your emergency reserves. If you really want to sleep well at night, I like to see most households with stable jobs amass three months of reserves, households with more volatile income sources put away six months of savings and the self-employed stockpile a year’s worth of expenses.
  9. Come back to your 401(k) and cap it off. If you still have money left after taking advantage of numbers one through eight, you probably have a fairly high income. Maxing out your 401(k) or other corporate retirement plan will not only further pad your retirement savings, but will also reduce your taxable income for every dollar contributed. You may contribute up to $17,500 per person — and a whopping $23,000 for investors 50 or older — in 2014.
  10. Set aside excess savings in a liquid, taxable investment account for mid-term needs and projects. Emergency savings helps protect you in the short-term. 401(k) and Roth IRA investments help secure your financial future. But if you’re only taking care of the short- and long-term, it leaves nothing for the mid-term. Therefore, opening a regular, taxable investment account will help you set aside money for a boat, excess education costs, a closely held business investment or the down payment on a second home or a rental property. This money should be invested in accordance with the time horizon for its use.

Conspicuously missing from this list are non-deductible Traditional IRAs, annuities, all forms of permanent life insurance and hundreds of other marketed repositories for your money. These products have their uses, but they simply don’t take priority over these ten financial initiatives. In all, I estimate the “cost” of checking off each of the listed priorities to be more than $70,000 annually, surely requiring combined household income of $250,000 or more. That means you can likely free yourself from worrying about any of the additional pitches that come your way until you’ve mastered each of these.

If you enjoyed this post, please let me know on Twitter at @TimMaurer, and if you'd like to receive my weekly post via email, click HERE.

The 3 Keys to Surviving Major Life Transitions

Originally in ForbesYou might think that the most important work a financial advisor can do is related to allocating a client’s investment portfolio, or perhaps helping secure a timely insurance policy or drafting the optimal estate plan. In fact, their most important work is done when clients are in the midst of navigating life’s major transitions.

Help

I have very recently undergone two of these major life events — a job change and a move — in the span of five months. Crazy, right? Who would willingly subject themself to two of life’s most stressful changes within such a small window of time? Fortunately, I had at my disposal three keys to surviving major life transitions, and I’d like to share them with you:

Key #1: Flexibility

“Blessed are the hearts that can bend; they shall never be broken.” — Albert Camus

In February, I left the company I loved after seven years of life-changing work to lock arms with a national alliance of financial advisory pioneers dedicated to the practice of “building relationships by doing the right thing.” But in order to build a new and rewarding relationship with them, I had no choice but to sever some relationships with others.

I had to tell colleagues at my former company — good friends — that I was leaving, knowing that our work was the primary basis for our friendship. I also had to forgo working with some clients whose financial plans I’d helped craft, and in whom I’d invested personally.

I had to impose myself on new colleagues as I fumbled through onboarding. I had to learn new systems, protocols and personalities. I had to wonder if, at the conclusion of a probationary stretch of forgone forgiveness, my new colleagues would still want me on their team!

So much change in so little time.

You’ve heard that death and taxes are life’s only guarantees. But I’m still holding out for an Elijah-style exit, and half of Europe pays taxes little mind. No, it is only change that is a guarantee in this life, and flexibility is its only effective counteragent.

We can and should envision and plan for major life transitions, but we should also expect our path to be diverted by unknown variables. We must be willing to flex our plans in these dynamic times of change.

Key #2: Margin

“Everything takes longer than it does.” — Ecuadorian proverb

In the  first week of June, my family moved from our beloved Baltimore — leaving behind our close-knit families, community support systems and favorite sports teams — in an experiment to see what life would look like from a different vantage point. We chose Charleston, South Carolina, as the backdrop for our adventure, pinpointed for its promise of a slower pace, higher quality of life and lower cost of living.

Major life transitions, however, are necessarily taxing on our time and money, at least initially. And because of the elements unique to every major life event, it is virtually impossible to accurately forecast the necessary allotment of time and money that will be required.

This can be maddening to me as a financial planner. I strive to forecast every expense one could anticipate, but change invariably costs more money and consumes more time than expected.

The only solution is to plan for the unexpected by leaving a reasonable margin of time and money — a buffer — that can be consumed by the inevitable surprises that arise. Expect that it will take 20% longer and cost 20% more. This is the only defense against heaping more stress on an inherently stressful event.

I’ll also add that our move was, in part, an exercise in the creation of margin. Despite Charleston’s great reputation as a city that offers  a high quality of life, the cost of housing, especially, is still lower than in the Mid-Atlantic. We were able to reduce our overall monthly housing costs, our biggest single expense, by 20%.

We also added a significant margin of time to our calendars. We effectively wiped clean our slate of commitments, decades in the making, and now we get to choose exactly what, where, when and to whom we’re willing to dedicate ourselves.

Key #3: Grace

“Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement.” — C.S. Lewis

Failure is inevitable, especially in the case of major life events. Grace is unmerited favor in the face of failure. This brand of grace is most often discussed from the pulpit on Sundays, but I raise the topic here more for its practical benefits than its spiritual.

The nature of life’s major transitions — specifically the changes and surprises that come with them —are a breeding ground for failure. Some are inconsequential while others come with great risks, but most come as a result of our limitations.

We err, and in order to move forward we must extend grace to ourselves and to the others on our journey.

It must be said that not all major life transitions are equal. The benefit of my recent life events is that each of them, while taxing and stressful, led to something new and exciting. You may be facing another brand of life event — a death, a divorce, an injury or a loss not of your choosing. Your situation is different — it’s harder — but that makes the use of these three keys even more vital.

When we employ flexibility, margin and grace in navigating life’s biggest transitions, we have the opportunity to not only survive them, but to thrive in and through and even because of them.

If you enjoyed this post, please let me know on Twitter at @TimMaurer, and if you'd like to receive my weekly post via email, click HERE.

 

My bad! I was wrong about rising rates and bonds

Originally published CNBC

"I was wrong."

There are few words strung together that possess such power to free us. In less than a second, we're able to reconcile the inconsistency between our previous conviction and the apparent truth. Humbling, yes, but also strangely euphoric.

Well, I've earned the opportunity to claim said euphoria, as I must confess that I had bought into the most prevalent myth du jour surrounding bond investing. You'll forgive me, I hope, because this misconception—like all of the most powerful ones—is especially deceptive because it's grounded in half-truth.

bondpit

Let's be quite clear: Rising rates simply do not guarantee negative bond returns.

The Scarcity Fallacy: Is Less Really More?

Originally in ForbesHaving the privilege of walking through life with people vocationally, aiding in the acquisition, maintenance and dispossession of earthly resources as a financial advisor, I’m burdened with a heightened sense of the battling spirits of scarcity and abundance.

The dehumanizing poverty that torments the Majority World screams that resources—here and now—are scarce. Remembering when I handed a bowl of vitamin-charged oatmeal to a boy who lives and breathes in La Chureca, the Nicaraguan squatter town subsisting off of Managua’s trash, I occasionally twinge at my willingness to pay $5 for a cup of premium Central American coffee. That expenditure could buy a week’s worth of mush, keeping children of the dump alive.

This is one of the children at the feeding center in "La Chureca," the city dump in Managua, Nicaragua.

This is one of the children at the feeding center in "La Chureca," the city dump in Managua, Nicaragua.

How could I not consume less?

And share more?

Why Beating The Market Is An Uphill Skate

Originally in ForbesIt is absolutely possible to beat the market, just as I’m sure it’s possible that someone could climb Mt. Everest in a pair of roller skates.

It is so improbable, however, that it’s rendered a fruitless, if not counterproductive, pursuit.

After 16 years in the financial industry and seeing countless great investors eventually humbled by market forces they could not control, I’ve finally relinquished my skates.

Mt._Everest_from_Gokyo_Ri_November_5,_2012

Make Your Career Move An Easy Job

 

Originally published CNBCYou know what has to be done, but it doesn't make it any easier. You've done all the research, asked all the questions and mulled over your options, and you know that moving on from your current company is the right thing to do.

 

interview6

You wince, imagining the look on the face of your boss and co-workers when you tell them. You're no longer an insider, but an outsider or—worse—a competitor. Even your relationship as friends could be compromised. It's stressful for everyone, but especially for you because ultimately it's your choice.

As you go through your morning routine on the day you're delivering the news to your company, every step seems more pronounced than it typically does. Maybe it's because you recognize it could be the last time you'll go through the paces exactly like this. Or maybe it's because the adrenaline has already notched up in anticipation of the discussions you're about to have with your boss and colleagues.

Indeed, along with marriage, divorce, death and personal injury, changing jobs is consistently ranked as one of the most stressful things a person can do. That stress can be substantially reduced, however, if you're better prepared for what comes next. Here are three ways to make the most of your job transition:

1. Leave well. "It's more important to leave well than it is to start well," a good friend once told me. And it's true. You've already made a good impression on your new company—you got the job! But while you're heading on to new and exciting adventures, your former employer is left to deal with the rejection and cleanup from your departure.

Make it easier by offering to stay on for a reasonable period of time, but not longer. In most cases, shorter is better for all parties, as it reduces the awkwardness and hastens the healing.

Part of leaving well is preparing to deal with impulsive counterattacks mounted consciously or unconsciously by your former co-workers. Especially if you brought or maintained client relationships, the words "I'm leaving" may magically transform you from friend to foe—but let that be their choice, not yours. Take the high road whenever possible.

2. Don't leave anything behind. Along with your personal Swingline stapler and the letter opener your parents gave you, don't leave your 401(k) or any other transferable benefits behind.

Specifically regarding your 401(k) or other comparable plan, you typically have three options, depending on the design of the plan you're leaving and the plan your new company offers. The first option is to leave it there; I rarely recommend this unless you're in love with the plan investment options and pay close attention to them.

Option two is to transfer the old 401(k) into the new plan, if they allow it. This gives you the benefits of consolidation and, while rarely advisable, the ability to borrow from your plan—a provision not available in old retirement plans or IRAs.

For most, the sensible choice is to aggregate the newly antiquated 401(k) plan with other prior plans in the form of a direct rollover to an IRA. In this case, you are not limited to the investment options in the new 401(k)—options that are notoriously mediocre. Be certain to check all the right boxes to ensure that your rollover is not a taxable event.

It's also important to take stock of any company benefits that are transferable. Although they are nearly extinct, pension plans of various sorts accrued during your tenure may do nothing for you now but could be meaningful in the future.

One client recently had a premonition that she'd left a small pension behind from a previous job. I encouraged her to call the company's human resources department, and indeed, there was $9,000 sitting in a plan earning 3 percent per year that she can't touch for another 15 years.

If you're blessed enough to have annual income in excess of your saving and spending needs, you may have a qualified or non-qualified deferred compensation plan to handle. And while also rare, there are occasions in which group benefits—such as life, disability income or long-term care insurance through your company—can also be traversed to private policies with the vendor.

3. Make the most of your fresh start. Nobody's perfect—including you. But as the saintly image of yourself you've been promoting to your new company starts to settle into something closer to reality, you do have an opportunity to trade some bad habits for good ones.

Take advantage of this clean slate by embracing the time-management method that's worked so well for your friend, or finally start using a system to seize control of your email inbox.

Develop a healthier rhythm of life and work. Be careful not to overextend yourself at the beginning of the new gig, lest you set expectations you'll never be able to live up to.

Make wise choices with your new benefits package. Increase your 401(k) contribution to the level you know you should be saving, and put sufficient time into really understanding the new investment options and determining the optimal mix for you. Don't forget to add beneficiaries to your new 401(k) plan and any group life-insurance coverage in the new benefits package.

As you review your group benefits—especially health, life and long-term disability-income insurance—be sure to actually understand them and acknowledge whether or not you should be supplementing them privately. (You can be almost sure that the base level of free life and disability-income insurance is insufficient.)

Consider opening your mind to a high-deductible health plan, which gives you the option to utilize a Health Savings Account (HSA). Many assume this is too complicated or costly, especially if you have a young family, but even in that case, this can be a great way to make nearly all of your household medical expenses tax deductible.

While certainly stressful, a job change navigated well can be an amazing personal and professional launchpad—especially when you leave on good terms, don't leave anything behind and take full advantage of the fresh start.

If you enjoyed this post, please let me know on Twitter at @TimMaurer, and if you'd like to receive my weekly post via email, click HERE.

Tim Maurer, a certified financial planner, is director of personal finance at the BAM Alliance and an adjunct faculty member at Towson University. He has co-written two books with best-selling author Jim Stovall. Their most recent release is "The Ultimate Financial Plan: Balancing Your Money and Life." 

 

Why I Gave Away My Company To Charity

A Guest Post From Derek Sivers

Tim's Note: In last week’s post, “It’s About You, Not Me,” I announced that to celebrate the release of my new book co-authored with Jim Stovall, The Ultimate Financial Plan, I’d be featuring four consecutive guest posts from some of the most compelling authors and bloggers you’ll read today.  I can’t tell you how honored I am that any of them—much less all four—would’ve accepted my invitation, and we get kicked off today with a post that will blow your mind from entrepreneur and best-selling author, Derek Sivers.

In short, Derek is a musician with enough technical ingenuity, passion and vision to have truly changed the way music is delivered today.  (You’ve probably benefited from his work without even knowing it!) 

Frustrated that there were no online outlets on which independent musicians (most of the musicians out there who haven’t received a big record contract), could sell their music, Derek created one, simply to sell his own music.  After a few other bands asked if he could replicate the trick on their websites, he realized he may be able to create a company that would provide this and other services to independent musicians.  Years later, Apple’s famous leader, Steve Jobs, was knocking on Derek’s door asking him to make his extensive online library of independent music available on iTunes.[i][ii] 

At the peak of his success, Derek felt the call to leave his baby—CD Baby—in the qualified hands of others and he sold the company.  For $22 million! (Not bad for a “struggling musician.”)  But get this—he had already placed CD Baby in a trust that would irrevocably give the proceeds to charity.  Here’s a piece of his story:

Two friends were at a party held at the mansion of a billionaire. One said, “Wow! Look at this place! This guy has everything!” The other said, “Yes, but I have something he'll never have: enough.

When I decided to sell my company in 2008, I already had enough.

I live simply. I hate waste and excess. I have a good apartment, a good laptop, and a few other basics. But the less I own, the happier I am. The lack of possessions gives me the priceless freedom to live anywhere anytime.

Having too much money can be harmful. It throws off perspective. It makes people do stupid things like buy “extra” cars or houses they don't use - or upgrade to first class for “only” $10,000 so they can be a little more comfortable for a few hours.

So I didn't need or even want the money from the sale of the company. I just wanted to make sure I had enough for a simple comfortable life. The rest should go to music education, since that's what made such a difference in my life.

So I found a great way to do this. I created a charitable trust called the “Independent Musicians Charitable Remainder Unitrust.” When I die, all of its assets will go to music education. But while I'm alive, it pays out 5% of its value per year to me.

(Note: 5% is the minimum allowed by law. It's still too much. I would have preferred 1%, but oh well. I'm free to use it to start new businesses to help people, or whatever.)

A few months before the sale, I transferred the ownership of CD Baby and HostBaby, all the intellectual property like trademarks and software, into the trust.

It was irreversibly and irrevokably gone. It was no longer mine. It all belonged to the charitable trust.

Then, when Disc Makers bought it, they bought it not from me but from the trust, turning it into $22 million cash to benefit music education.

So instead of me selling the company - (getting taxed on the income, and giving what's left to charity) - that move of giving away the company to charity then having the charity sell it saved about $5 million in taxes. (That means $5 million more going to music education.)

Also, the move of giving it away into a trust now - instead of holding on to it until I die - means its investments get to grow and compound tax-free for life, which again means more goes to musicians in the end.

I'm only writing this article because many people have asked why I gave it away, so I thought I'd write my long explanation once and for all.

It's not that I'm altruistic. I'm sacrificing nothing. I've just learned what makes me happy. And doing it this way made me the happiest.

I get the deeper happiness of knowing the lucky streak I've had in my life will benefit tons of people - not just me.

I get the pride of knowing I did something irreversibly smart before I could change my mind.

I get the safety of knowing I won't be the target of a frivolous lawsuit, since I have very little net worth.

I get the unburdened freedom of having it out of my hands so I can't do something stupid.

But most of all, I get the constant priceless reminder that I have enough.

I have not seen anyone more personify “The Gift of Enough,” as Jim and I discuss it in The Ultimate Financial Plan.  I encourage you to indulge in more of Derek’s story outlined in his book, Anything You Want.  The surprises don’t end with his massive gift, and whether you’re a successful business owner or a starving artist, you’ll find a ton of money-and-life wisdom in his book and his blog.

Thanks for sharing part of your story with us, Derek!


[i] Since when does Steve Jobs have to ask for ANYTHING??  (Except, of course, for rights to the Beatles library…which he eventually got.)

[ii] Interestingly, I’ve had the privilege to see Derek’s brainchild at work.  Outside of personal finance, my foremost hobby is music, and as the drummer for my brother’s band—The Jon Maurer Band—we were recently able to release our debut EP through the company Derek created, CD Baby.  For little more than peanuts, here’s what our profile page looks like on the CD Baby site: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/thejonmaurerband.

It’s About You, Not Me

I announced a few weeks ago that my second book, a co-authored project with best-selling author, Jim Stovall, would be coming out shortly.  Upon release of that news and the book’s title—The Ultimate Financial Plan—a few of my closest friends gave me some good-natured ribbing for a title that could be presumed a dubious self-proclamation of preeminence.  So although I know they were only kidding, I’d like to use this as an opportunity to explain the origin and meaning of the title and make an exciting announcement about TimMaurer.com blog posts in the month of September.

Jim Stovall and I believe with every fiber of our beings that contained in this book is, indeed, the ultimate financial plan.  However, it’s not about us.  We don’t claim to be the brightest financial minds in the universe.  We don’t purport this book to be the number one source of all facts and numbers pertaining to the discipline of personal finance (thank goodness, because it would be too long and boring).  Nor do we allege it to contain the most cutting edge thinking that will revolutionize the business or practice of financial planning — with an advisor or on your own.

Personal finance is more personal than it is finance.

The reason we believe this to be the ultimate offering in its genre is quite the opposite.  It’s not so much about us, but more about YOU.  This book is strenuously focused on you, your values and your plans for the present and future.  We may appear to represent a financial industry, which, even after a timeless humbling through the financial crisis, still seems to muster a condescending tone.  Even some of my favorite personal finance gurus are famous for calling out the stupidity of their followers.  But we’re not.  We’re not talking down to you from the pulpit, but instead across the table.  We’re not sharing insight about concepts we’ve ginned up to sell a book.  We’re sharing personal narratives and experiences we’ve gained from employing these concepts—both in our own lives and in the lives of those we advise and influence.

Let’s also not forget this book is another in a series of books Jim has written that began with The Ultimate Gift.  Selling more than four million copies and seeing it turned into a movie starring James Garner, Brian Dennehy and Abigail Breslin was affirmation enough that the heart of Jim’s novel, a story about a wayward young man learning to earn his inheritance, impacted people deeply.   It was followed by The Ultimate Life (also soon to be released as a movie).  Frankly, when I approached Jim about co-authoring a book that would allow the timeless wisdom of The Ultimate Gift to be translated through a personal finance guidebook, he hesitated, having maintained a personal policy of not co-authoring.  But then Jim realized this could be his contribution to a world ever increasingly in need of applicable wisdom facing the big climb out of the financial crisis crater.

Simply put, we believe personal finance is more personal than it is finance, so our stories and advice and practical applications are skewed heavily in that direction.

A very special September

We’re going to commit a cardinal marketing sin and take the focus further off of us just as this week marks our official promotional kick-off of the book’s release.  Over the next four weeks, I’ll be featuring guest posts from four world-class authors and bloggers that have been an inspiration to me and millions of others through their work.  I’m honored and humbled that they’ve each shown a willingness to engage you, personally, on this blog.  You’ll surely not want to miss them:

  • Thursday, September 8th, you’ll enjoy a post from entrepreneur and the best-selling author of Anything You Want, Derek Sivers, explaining why he, after building a company that revolutionized the music sales industry (CD Baby), gave the $22 million proceeds from its sale to charity.  (Yes, you read that correctly.)
  • Thursday, September 15th, I’ll share a post from Chris Guillebeau, a travel and career author and blogger whose every move is followed by over 150,000 online readers.  Chris took the time to entertain and educate us on “The $30 Hotel and the Battleship Slumber Party.”
  • Thursday, September 22nd, our guest post will come from J.D. Roth.  J.D. is a blogging pioneer in the realm of personal finance who started the uber-successful blog, “Get Rich Slowly,” voted as one of Time magazine’s “Best Blogs of 2011.”  J.D. will be sharing his take on the intensely personal elements of personal finance.
  • Finally, on Thursday, September 29, I’m excited to see what Carl Richards has drawn up for us.  Carl is the cutting edge financial planner who has worked his way into the hearts of so many through his Behavior Gap blog featured in the New York Times, employing little more than a sharp wit and a Sharpie pen in his exploration of the relationship between money and values.

I look forward to bringing you these world class writers through TimMaurer.com.

Oh, and by the way…

The Ultimate Financial Plan IS now available for purchase on Amazon.com and Barnesandnoble.com.  You can also purchase it on your Kindle  and you should see it available on your Nook and in bookstores everywhere within a week.  Thanks for passing the word if you’re so inclined!